Henry Catalogue 2010 - page 53

Industrial & Commercial Refrigeration Products
800.96.HENRY
®
COMPONENTS
R4
Correct oil separator sizing is essential for proper oil separation and minimal pressure drop across the separator. The follow-
ing example will demonstrate how to select an oil separator based on four primary system conditions and using the DCFM
charts on the following page. It is important to determine the discharge cubic feet per minute of the hot gas flow approaching
the separator. The DCFM is a theoretical sizing value used to predict which model will offer the best oil separation efficiency
for a set of conditions. Henry offers three different designs, helical, conventional screen, and coalescing.
OIL SEPARATORS
Calculating Separator DCFM
Helical Separators:
This design relies on adequate gas velocities to allow for oil extraction from the hot gas so sizing accord-
ing to the DCFM rating is important. Page 6 shows the min/max ratings allowed for sufficient separation and low pressure
drop. When sized correctly the helical models will separate 95-99% of the oil from the hot gas.
Conventional Screen:
This oil separator should not be undersized (calculated DCFM greater than 125% of nominal), which
would cause higher gas velocities to pass through the inlet/outlet screens. Higher flow velocities may cause pre-mature fail-
ure of the screens.
Sizing Notes
Selection Example
Primary Conditions
Evaporating Temperature, -40°F
Condensing Temperature, 105°F
Tons of Refrigeration or Air Conditioning, 20 Tons
Following the 105°F condensing temp line from the right side to the vertical line at -40°F corresponds to ~0.87on the DCFM/
Ton axis. This factor is multiplied by the Tons of refrigeration (0.86 x 20) to yield 17.2 DCFM.
80
85
90
95
100
105
110
115
0.600
0.700
0.800
0.900
1.000
1.100
-50
-40
-30
-20
-10
0
10
20
30
40
DISCHARGE CFM/TON R
EVAPORATING TEMP
O
F
R404A / R507 DISCHARGECFM
CONDENSING TEMP
O
F
1...,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51,52 54,55,56,57,58,59,60,61,62,63,...119
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